Sunday, November 7, 2010

More Lightroom Control Tips

After reading Helen Bradley's advice for localized tonal control in Lightroom that I mentioned yesterday, I continued digging a little deeper for specialized tools to provide more control over local adjustments within Lightroom. Sure enough, DPS came through again with a tutorial about using a couple of existing tools together for a brand new effect—erasing graduated filter effects with precision. Let's say you've got a portrait of a person on a blue background. You could use a graduated filter to darken the top of the background, blending it downward with the natural effects of the filter. The problem is, you might darken the subject's face as well. As Elizabeth Halford points out in her DPS post, you can effectively erase the graduated filter by using the adjustment brush. If you dropped brightness -20 with the graduated filter, you can boost it +20 with the brush to selective erase the effect. It's a simple trick, but a great one for extending the value of Lightroom local adjustments—which is always a bonus if you're looking to streamline your workflow.

http://www.digital-photography-school.com/lightroom-how-i-erase-portions-of-the-graduated-filter 
DPMag Published in Blog
More Lightroom Control Tips


After reading Helen Bradley's advice for localized tonal control in Lightroom that I mentioned yesterday, I continued digging a little deeper for specialized tools to provide more control over local adjustments within Lightroom. Sure enough, DPS came through again with a tutorial about using a couple of existing tools together for a brand new effect—erasing graduated filter effects with precision. Let's say you've got a portrait of a person on a blue background. You could use a graduated filter to darken the top of the background, blending it downward with the natural effects of the filter. The problem is, you might darken the subject's face as well. As Elizabeth Halford points out in her DPS post, you can effectively erase the graduated filter by using the adjustment brush. If you dropped brightness -20 with the graduated filter, you can boost it +20 with the brush to selective erase the effect. It's a simple trick, but a great one for extending the value of Lightroom local adjustments—which is always a bonus if you're looking to streamline your workflow.

http://www.digital-photography-school.com/lightroom-how-i-erase-portions-of-the-graduated-filter 
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