Sunday, April 3, 2011

How To Properly Get Permission To Shoot On Location

I don't like asking for permission. I generally want to do what I want when I want and how I want. This gets me into a fair amount of trouble. It would really get me into trouble if I applied this same philosophy to photographing in public, but I'm smart enough to know that photo shoots tend to attract attention, and if you don't have permission to shoot in public you're probably going to get hassled. Even worse, you might be sent packing. That's bad on any shoot, but especially so if you're a professional working with a budget and client. Cancelled shoots cost money, and so it's important to get permission—and the necessary permits—for your location photo and video shoots. You might think that a park is public property, but in fact if you're setting up a commercial venture, or even a private photo shoot that simply prevents others from enjoying the park, you're darn right you need permission. Thankfully this post by photographer Chase Jarvis explains how and why to go about getting the necessary permits for your public photo shoots, and he even includes examples of actual paperwork and documents from his own client-driven assignments. The bottom line is this: if you're shooting for money, you're practically always going to need permission. And even if you're shooting just for fun, you sometimes need permission too. Check out the blog to find out how to get it.

http://blog.chasejarvis.com/blog/2011/03/how-to-permit-photo-video-shoots/
DPMag Published in Blog
How To Properly Get Permission To Shoot On Location


I don't like asking for permission. I generally want to do what I want when I want and how I want. This gets me into a fair amount of trouble. It would really get me into trouble if I applied this same philosophy to photographing in public, but I'm smart enough to know that photo shoots tend to attract attention, and if you don't have permission to shoot in public you're probably going to get hassled. Even worse, you might be sent packing. That's bad on any shoot, but especially so if you're a professional working with a budget and client. Cancelled shoots cost money, and so it's important to get permission—and the necessary permits—for your location photo and video shoots. You might think that a park is public property, but in fact if you're setting up a commercial venture, or even a private photo shoot that simply prevents others from enjoying the park, you're darn right you need permission. Thankfully this post by photographer Chase Jarvis explains how and why to go about getting the necessary permits for your public photo shoots, and he even includes examples of actual paperwork and documents from his own client-driven assignments. The bottom line is this: if you're shooting for money, you're practically always going to need permission. And even if you're shooting just for fun, you sometimes need permission too. Check out the blog to find out how to get it.

http://blog.chasejarvis.com/blog/2011/03/how-to-permit-photo-video-shoots/
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