Monday, November 5, 2012

Corporate Portrait BTS Video

Corporate portraits are a pretty common assignment for commercial photographers. In fact, I do them myself on a pretty regular basis. This video from Jay P. Morgan of the Slanted Lens shows a textbook approach to a corporate portrait assignment. A few differences I'll mention, compared to how I like to do it. First, I prefer a seated subject for a headshot. I think it makes for a nicer, more formal portrait. The tradeoff is that a larger subject may tend to look heavier when seated, so for those instances I'll have them stand. Second, I like a more symmetrical background light; rather than placing it off to the side, I prefer the background light centered behind the subject—often from a floor stand below the frame. And third, and maybe most important, I always—and I mean ALWAYS—use a lens hood. Those first two are personal preferences, but I consider a lens hood practically mandatory in this situation—especially if you'll be shooting directly toward that hairlight in the background. Aside from my little tweaks, this video is really great, and a must-see for anyone wondering how to approach this type of corporate portrait assignment.

http://strobist.blogspot.com/2012/09/watch-this-jay-p-morgans-corporate.html
DPMag Published in Blog
Corporate Portrait BTS Video


Corporate portraits are a pretty common assignment for commercial photographers. In fact, I do them myself on a pretty regular basis. This video from Jay P. Morgan of the Slanted Lens shows a textbook approach to a corporate portrait assignment. A few differences I'll mention, compared to how I like to do it. First, I prefer a seated subject for a headshot. I think it makes for a nicer, more formal portrait. The tradeoff is that a larger subject may tend to look heavier when seated, so for those instances I'll have them stand. Second, I like a more symmetrical background light; rather than placing it off to the side, I prefer the background light centered behind the subject—often from a floor stand below the frame. And third, and maybe most important, I always—and I mean ALWAYS—use a lens hood. Those first two are personal preferences, but I consider a lens hood practically mandatory in this situation—especially if you'll be shooting directly toward that hairlight in the background. Aside from my little tweaks, this video is really great, and a must-see for anyone wondering how to approach this type of corporate portrait assignment.

http://strobist.blogspot.com/2012/09/watch-this-jay-p-morgans-corporate.html
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